September 5th – A Scorcher

An adult (AHY) Baltimore Oriole sporting a freshly-moulted plumage.   B. Fotheringham

An adult (AHY) Baltimore Oriole sporting a freshly-moulted plumage. B. Fotheringham


Started opening before 6:00 AM. Even then the temperature was at 23 C and it was MUGGY – I worked up a sweat by the second net lane. It’s not supposed to be like this! I think of early September mornings as cool and refreshing….not this.
The first Black-billed Cuckoo seen this year.   B. Fotheringham

The first Black-billed Cuckoo seen this year. B. Fotheringham


We experienced birds in pockets – small mixed-species flocks, usually around chickadees. Vireos and warblers were the birds of the day with warblers (10 species) making up 40% of the catch.
First Western Palm Warbler of the season...on its way to Cuba.

First Western Palm Warbler of the season…on its way to Cuba.


We trusted to internet technology in making decisions around closing nets. A thunderstorm had been forecast and was due to hit at 11:00 AM (I love the precision of these predictions). At 10:30 we were hearing thunder and seeing thunderheads building just to the north of us. We quickly checked the weather radar, which showed an intense storm cell moving right toward us. So….we hustled around closing nets. And then…nothing. We were right at the edge: directly over the banding lab the storm clouds started and extended to the north; and blue skies started, extending south. We got no rain. But the nets were closed and we weren’t interested in reopening them for an hour.
An Eastern Wood Pewee look for insects to hawk from its exposed perch.    B. Fotheringham

An Eastern Wood Pewee look for insects to hawk from its exposed perch. B. Fotheringham


A very obvious "stress bar" - as it lines up evenly on all the tail feathers, it tells you that this young (HY) bird underwent some sort of nutritional stress at the time these feathers were growing.   B. Fotheringham

A very obvious “stress bar” – as it lines up evenly on all the tail feathers, it tells you that this young (HY) bird underwent some sort of nutritional stress at the time these feathers were growing. B. Fotheringham


A Chestnut-sided Warbler sporting its lime-green "basic" plumage.

A Chestnut-sided Warbler sporting its lime-green “basic” plumage.


Banded 42:
4 Eastern Wood Pewees
2 Traill’s Flycatchers
1 House Wren
1 Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
4 Swainson’s Thrushes
2 Wood Thrushes
4 Gray Catbirds
4 Warbling Vireos
3 Red-eyed Vireos
5 Chestnut-sided Warblers
2 Magnolia Warblers
1 Blackburnian Warbler
1 Western Palm Warbler
1 Bay-breasted Warbler
1 Blackpoll Warbler
2 Canada Warblers
1 American Redstart
1 Ovenbird
1 Common Yellowthroat
1 Chipping Sparrow

ET’s: 50 spp.
Rick

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