September 14th – Ah….The Irony

Male Black-throated Blue Warbler. -JDF


When I started opening this morning I looked up high into the eastern sky and saw Orion and…..ironically….the Winter Triangle!? Over the past couple of days and for the next few we are back in Summer mode with hot, humid conditions. This usually translates, for us, into low banding numbers. And our recent results show it:

We’ve been seeing (and catching) a lot of hummingbirds in the last few days. -AAW


A very young Eastern Bluebird. -AAW


September 12th; Banded 31:
1 Swainson’s Thrush
1 American Robin
1 Gray Catbird
1 Warbling Vireo
4 Red-eyed Vireos
2 Tennessee Warblers
1 Nashville Warbler
2 Magnolia Warblers
1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
1 Canada Warbler
1 Common Yellowthroat
3 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
1 Field Sparrow
11 American Goldfinches

ET’s: 35 spp.

September 13th; Banded 13:
1 Eastern Phoebe
1 American Robin
1 Philadelphia Warbler
1 Blackpoll Warbler
9 American Goldfinches

ET’s: 44 spp. (including a Great Egret)

September 14th; Banded 21:
2 Eastern Wood-pewee
1 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
2 House Wrens
1 Veery
4 Swainson’s thrushes

Comparison: Wood Thrush on the left (rufous just on the head and heavy spotting)and Veery (rufous all over and faint spotting) . -DOL


1 Wood Thrush
3 Gray Catbirds
1 Red-eyed Vireo

Joanne with a lovely male BTBW.


1 Black-throated Blue Warbler
1 Blackpoll Warbler
1 Common Yellowthroat

Female Scarlet Tanager. -JDF


1 Scarlet Tanager
1 Rose-breasted Grosbeak
1 American Goldfinch

ET’s: 39 spp.

Fern Hill Burlington:

Janice….talking about birds to a young class. -KAP


Hi Rick and Happy Fall Migration!
Our first couple of banding days at Fern Hill School Burlington were a success. Janice and I were both pleased to see our returning Young Ornithologists our first morning, and as the next two days progressed the Field Station was busy with students popping in and out throughout the morning. I was happy to welcome our school’s new students in, it is always great to see their faces as they are immediately captivated by the magic of the birds. Speaking of birds, they didn’t disappoint!

On Tuesday September the 11th we had an estimated total of 28 species observed and banded a total of 13 birds, a nice steady flow throughout the day to show the students including:
1 American Goldfinch

Magnolia Warbler. -KAP


4 Magnolia Warblers
1 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Chipping Sparrow
1 Red Eyed Vireo

Male Mourning Warbler. -KAP


1 Mourning Warbler
1 Song Sparrow
1 Grey Catbird
2 Yellow-shafted Flickers

Learning how to use binoculars. -KAP


On Wednesday September the 12th we had a total of 10 birds banded and an estimated total of 29 species throughout the day and on census.
We banded:
1 American Goldfinch
1 Magnolia Warbler
1 Yellow Warbler

Black-capped Chickadee. -KAP


1 Black-capped Chickadee
1 Trail’s Flycatcher
1 House Sparrow
1 Grey Catbird
2 Blue Jays
1 Yellow-shafted Flicker

Retrapped Warbling Vireo. -KAP


We also had a special recapture today, a returning Warbling Vireo that was originally banded in 2017 on September 20th!
Katherine

Fern Hill Oakville:
We got off to a good start despite the temperatures which spiked by mid-morning. We have an enthusiastic group of returning Young Ornithologists that are very keen. We taught the 3 kindergarten classes throughout the morning and, fortunately, had birds for them to see and experience – these will be the Young Ornithologists of the future.

Banded 12:
1 Blue Jay
2 Black-capped Chickadees
2 Red-eyed Vireos

Very dull Bay-breasted Warbler. -DOL


1 Bay-breasted Warbler
1 Chipping Sparrow
1 Song Sparrow
4 American Goldfinches

ET’s: 23 spp.
Rick

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