November 6th – Winding Down

The White-throated Sparrow with the engorged tick - caught again together. The only damage would appear to be the loss of some feathers around the ear.

The White-throated Sparrow with the engorged tick – caught again today. The only damage would appear to be the loss of some feathers around the ear.


The flocks of Cedar Waxwings wheeling around the site were absent today – we saw only 24 and didn’t catch any of these. The only real excitement was privided by Rusty Blackbirdsn noisily oscillating between the treetops and the forest floor where they flipped over leaves searching for insects and grubs hiding beneath them. And although we saw 200 of them this was well below the numbers we’ve been seeing in the past 10 days. The feeling is that we are experiencing the tail end of the migration….as we should be in November. Somehow, it’s kind of sad.
Does anyone know what creature would build this grass nest?

Does anyone know what creature would build this grass nest?


Banded 40:
1 Mourning Dove
1 Downy Woodpecker
1 Blue Jay
3 Eastern Bluebirds
4 American Tree Sparrows
2 Song Sparrows
1 White-throated Sparrow
7 Dark-eyed Juncos
1 Rusty Blackbird
19 American Goldfinches

ET’s: 31 spp.

Note: Nancy is planning to band Saw-whets Friday night.
Rick

4 thoughts on “November 6th – Winding Down

  1. I just wanted to thank you, your staff/volunteers for the work you do and the wonderful experience my wife and I enjoyed last Sunday Nov 3rd. We would especially like to thank Nancy for her kindness, time and the knowledge she shared with us. She made a beautiful experience even better. We hope to see her and an owl or two tomorrow night. By the way, I still cannot believe I had a cardinal in my hand.

  2. Nice try…but a) it’s way to big for a wren nest; b) they prefer cavities; c) it has only been in place for a week or so (and the wrens are long gone). The consensus opinion so far is either red squirrel or flying squirrel (which, I guess, doesn’t make it a consensus…..).

Leave a Reply