May 8th – The End Of A Long, Cold Spring?

Northern Parula - there were a couple hanging around the big willow, just outside the banding lab.  -N. Furber

Northern Parula – there were a couple hanging around the big willow, just outside the banding lab. -N. Furber


Yesterday, I sensed a change was in the wind and today it just came bursting out, making up for a long, cold Spring. The picnic table just outside the banding lab was the place to be as it gave front row seats to a show of Warblers that were taking advantage of the many insects haunting the opening leaves. At any one time throughout the morning you could find 6 different species of warblers in the tree as well as both orioles, kinglets, Rose-breasted Grosbeaks and Cedar Waxwings. Each net round was exciting as you just didn’t know what you might find. And although we weren’t overwhelmed with birds we had our biggest day of the year so far both in terms of numbers banded (55) and species banded (24).
Male Black and White Warbler.    -D. Boyes

Male Black and White Warbler. -D. Boyes


A beautiful Blue-headed Vireo.

A beautiful Blue-headed Vireo.


For the day we encountered 67 species, 15 of which were warblers: Nashville, Yellow, Magnolia, Northern Parula, Black-throated Blue, Black-throated Green, Yellow-rumped, Blackburnian, Western Palm, Bay-breasted, Black and White, Ovenbird, Northern Waterthrush, Common Yellowthroat, and Wilson’s.
The Wood Thrushes have been back for several days now.    -D. Boyes

The Wood Thrushes have been back for several days now. -D. Boyes

Firsts for the year were: Great Crested Flycatcher, Yellow-bellied Flycatcher, Blue-headed Vireo, Northern Parula, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Black-throated Green Warbler, Blackburnian Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, Northern Waterthrush, Ovenbird, Wilson’s Warbler.

Westerm Palm Warbler.    -D. Boyes

Westerm Palm Warbler. -D. Boyes


Second Year Male Indigo Bunting - in Thomas Stirr's backyard.    -T. Stirr

Second Year Male Indigo Bunting – in Thomas Stirr’s backyard. -T. Stirr


Rob Mueller sent me this picture of a male Baltimore Oriole - with a band - in his backyard in Toronto.    -R. Mueller

Rob Mueller sent me this picture of a male Baltimore Oriole – with a band – in his backyard in Toronto. -R. Mueller

I’m hoping that the unsettled weather will bring birds down over the next few days – especially for the open house on Saturday, International Migratory Bird Day, so that visitors can see these marvellous long-distance migrants.

Jordan, helping out with a grade 4 class, bands his first bird.....a Gray Catbird.

Jordan, helping out with a grade 4 class, bands his first bird…..a Gray Catbird.


Jordan with "his" Gray Catbird.

Jordan with “his” Gray Catbird.

Banded 55:
1 Mourning Dove
1 Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
1 Least Flycatcher
3 Ruby-crowned Kinglets
1 Wood Thrush
3 American Robins
6 Gray Catbirds
1 Blue-headed Vireo
2 Nashville Warblers
1 Magnolia Warbler
1 Western Palm Warbler
3 Black and White Warblers
4 Ovenbirds
4 Common Yellowthroats
3 Rose-breasted Grosbeaks
2 Chipping Sparrows
1 Field Sparrow
1 Song Sparrow
3 Lincoln’s Sparrows
3 Swamp Sparrows
2 White-throated Sparrows
2 Red-winged Blackbirds
4 Brown-headed Cowbirds
2 American Goldfinches

ET’s: 67 spp
Rick

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